11. No cure for terrorism

Article summary: 

Terrorism is a microbe that comes and goes, depending on the state’s immune system, but it never dies. There is no vaccine against terror because it was originally imposed with the help of the major powers.

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Fārouq al-Tawīl believes that terrorism is a microbe that comes and goes depending on the state’s immune system but never dies. There is no vaccine against terror because it was originally imposed with the assistance of the major powers which trained and financed terrorists to serve their own purposes.


He argues that terrorists are developing technically and technologically. Free-lancers like plumber Mahmoud ‘Abd al-Latīf who attempted the assassination of the late president Jamāl ‘Abd al-Nāsir have become more educated and skilled. Today’s most well-known terrorists are physician Dr. Ayman al-Zawāhrī and engineer Usāma Bin Lādin. Terrorists have moved from the use of knives and daggers to the use of weapons and hijacked airplanes.


Fārouq al-Tawīl states that Shukrī Ahmad Mustafa was a student of agronomy who during his imprisonment formed the Takfīr wa al-Hijra group. He was later the first terrorist to seek the help of a dismissed police officer called Tāriq using maps plans and developed weaponry to kidnap and kill Shaykh al-Dhahabī.


In the 1940s the Muslim Brotherhood attempted to attack the Ministry of the Interior with a dynamite-packed car the first example of the car bombs that we see today in Lebanon and Iraq.

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