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Naj‘ Hammādī / Qena

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37. Justice Served

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Article title: 
37. Justice Served
Article pages: 
2
Date of source: 
January 20, 2011
Author: 
Jamāl Nkrumah
Summary
Article summary: 

Analyzing the recent death sentence of the man who killed six worshippers outside a Coptic church in Naj‘ Hammādī on Christmas last year, journalist Gamal Nkrumah discusses diverse opinions on the court’s verdict and on Muslim-Christian relations in general.

Copts reacted with satisfaction and relief to Hammām al-Kamūnī’s death sentence, which they view as a precedent that puts an end to the previous tradition of declaring murderers of Copts as being insane or mentally unstable.

Samīr Marqus, chairman of the board of trustees of Al-Misrī Foundation for Citizenship, emphasized Muslim expressions of solidarity with Copts in the aftermath of the Alexandria attacks. He expressed his confidence in improving Muslim-Christian relations in Egypt, provided that the educational system, which still pictures Copts in a very negative way, was reformed.

Former deputy president of the National Council for Human Rights, Ahmad Kamāl ‘Abd al-Majd, calls for a Higher Council for National Unity to deal with Christian-Muslim matters – a suggestion that receives broad support by the Coptic community.

A more critical outlook is given by Nabīl ‘Abd al-Fattāh of the Al-Ahram Center for Political and Strategic Studies, who criticizes the interference by media, politicians, and human rights activists in inter-religious matters and confessional conflicts, sayiong this only dramatizes and thus worsens the situation.

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31. Sectarian Crime and Punishment

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31. Sectarian Crime and Punishment
Article pages: 
5
Date of source: 
January 19, 2010
Author: 
Not mentioned
Summary
Article summary: 

The article at hand revolves around the death sentence against Hammām al-Kamūnī, who killed six Coptic worshippers coming out of a church last Christmas, on January 6, 2010. While the article criticizes the court’s slow examination, it welcomes the harsh sentence, which sets an example of how severely sectarian crimes are punished.

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18. Monday Press Review: Gunman in Naj‘ Hammādī Case to be Put to Death

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Citation
Article title: 
Gunman in Naj‘ Hammādī Case to be Put to Death
Date of source: 
January 17, 2011
Author: 
Hānī Hamdī
Reviewer: 
Hānī H&#803amdī
Summary
Article summary: 

Monday’s Egyptian newspapers once again focused heavily on the Naj‘ Hammādī incidents of 2010...

 

Glossary: 
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16. Death Sentence for Copt Killer

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15. Death Sentence for Copt Killer
Article pages: 
1
Date of source: 
January 17, 2011
Author: 
Not mentioned
Summary
Article summary: 

An Egyptian emergency tribunal has sentenced Hammām al-Kamūnī to death for his part in the Christmas killing of six Christian worshippers and a Muslim police officer outside a church in Naj‘ Hammādī in January of 2010. Al-Kamūnī ‘s sentence will now be sent to the Grand Muftī for confirmation.

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70. "The Happiest Christmas of My Life"

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"The Happiest Christmas of My Life"
Date of source: 
January 7, 2011
Author: 
Jayson Casper
Summary
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This year's Coptic Christmas holiday comes exactly one year after a shooting outside a church in Naj‘ Hammādī and less than a week since a tragic church bombing left 23 dead in Alexandria. In light of these threats, AWR's Jayson Casper tells the story of how Coptic Christians celebrated the holiday with their Muslim neighbors amid heightened security...

 

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34. Handing Religious Tensions the Modern Way

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34. Handing Religious Tensions the Modern Way
Article pages: 
6
Date of source: 
December, 30 2010
Author: 
Samīr Marqus
Summary
Article summary: 

According to the article, one year ago Samīr Marqus predicted the consequences of religious tensions in Egypt, which resulted in the Naj‘ Hammādī incident. Political leadership then decided to reinforce the principles of the civil state and equal citizenship, in in order to encourage coexistence.

The author also references an article he wrote one year ago regarding religious tensions and visions for the upcoming decaden in Egypt. In the article, Marqus observed that the "safety level" of religious tensions had been exceeded and that some could not even admit what he sees as the evident deterioration of Muslim-Christian relations over the past 40 years. He discussed three approaches to fixing the problem: treating Copts as a class with specific rights; seprating the population depending on their religious affiliation (sectarian state); or full equality among citizens (a civic state).

Marqus claims that the Naj‘ Hammādī incident proved just how acute religious tensions had become, as well as their interconnectedness to other political and regional interests. According to the author, last year's Christmas shooting was a wake up call for many people who realized that they could no longer live with such a situation.

The editorial says that the most important outcome of Naj‘ Hammādī was political leadership's commitment to the modern civil state, along with its principle of equal citizenship and resolution to combat religious tensions.

Although 2010 opened on a very sobering note, each new incident brought on transformations in thought and behavior; some positively, others negatively.

The result of years of religious tensionis is on the one hand, the trand to drum up Islamic fervour, and on the other, the trend of erecting the bulwarks of a religious community's  seclusion. In the middle stands the mainstream trend, which supports the equal citizenship and which the political leadership promised to promote. Of course, it is Egyptians' task to respond effectively to this call.

Marqus claims that the starting point is to renew the Egyptian national partnership and accept diversity and pluralism. In order to do this, the media should first stop provoking the people and start insisting on professionalism and integrity. Next, it is important to take advantage of the principle of freedom of worship. Third, it is necessary to strengthen commitment to the rule of law. Finally, people must be actively engaged in public and political spheres.

According to the writer, by taking these steps it is possible to create a modern civil state on the basis of equal citizenship, equality of opportunity, and the rule of law.

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64. The Pope Meets the President

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64. The Pope Meets the President
Article pages: 
1
Date of source: 
December 26, 2010
Author: 
Nādir Shukrī
Summary
Article summary: 

Coptic Orthodox Patriarch Pope Shenouda and Egyptian President Husnī Mubārak met last Wednesday to discuss the release of 42 Coptic men who are still being held in connection with last month’s church riots in ‘Umrāniyyah.

“Well-informed sources” told Watani that the Pope criticized the security forces’ use of live ammunition in dealing with the rioters, two of which died. The paper states that 115 rioters have already been freed.

The article also hints that the Pope may have also discussed the ongoing investigation into the Naj‘ Hammādī slayings of last Christmas.

The article also quotes Father Mina of Mar Mina church in ‘Umrāniyyah, who complains that a nearby residential building was recently converted into a mosque without any permission from the government.

“Why shouldn’t the church be treated in the same way?” he asks.

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36. 2007; the year of hot files in Egypt’s churches

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36. 2007; the year of hot files in Egypt’s churches
Article pages: 
p. 19
Date of source: 
30-12-2007
Author: 
Wafa’ Wasfi
Reviewer: 
Katia Saqqa
Summary
Article summary: 

In spite of the different churches inaugurated in different parts of the world, the Coptic Orthodox Church witnessed serious challenges in 2007.

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25. Sit-ins against the church in the church

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Article title: 
25. Sit-ins against the church in the church
Article pages: 
p. 13
Date of source: 
31-12-2007
Author: 
Minerva S‘ad
Reviewer: 
Katia Saqqa
Summary
Article summary: 

Seven sit-ins were staged in Egypt’s churches in 2007. The following lines describe some of them and Christian clergymen and laymen’s reactions to them.

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33. In absence of evidence

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Article title: 
33. In absence of evidence
Article pages: 
p. 3
Date of source: 
25-05-2008
Author: 
Robeir al-Faris
The head of the Azhar university declares that non-Muslims are not apostates
Summary
Article summary: 

The article covers issues that have made the headlines in Egypt in the last month and includes the story of a postman was detained for two months, a fatwá that was issued declaring that non-Muslims are not apostates and the contentious issue of a piece of land near St. Macarius monastery that has been sold.

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