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74. Absence of national unity between religion and politics

Citation
Article title: 
74. Absence of national unity between religion and politics
Publishers: 
Year: 
2006
Week: 
50
Article number: 
74
Article pages: 
p. 84
Date of source: 
09-12-2006
Author: 
Ahmad Hamrush
Reviewer: 
Wafa’ Husam al-Din
Text
Article summary: 

The author discusses national unity in the Arab world.

Article full text: 

The

term

‘national unity’ is being used a great deal recently. The term is used in Iraq to talk about

establishing a

government of national unity. In addition, the term is used in Palestine where different

political fractions hold

meetings and conferences to fulfill their unity, but they gain nothing. It is also

used in Lebanon to change the

government. In addition, Sudan is now fighting to achieve a national unity

that can produce a unified Sudan. The

term is raised in Somalia in the hope of reaching national unity,

while fighting factions are only enhancing the

division.
This phenomenon is widespread in the Middle

East, and we need to fight in order to conquer all

obstacles that hinder national unity and cause wars and

violent attacks. The author believes that the main reason

for the lack of unity lies in the existing

conflict between religion and politics.
Moreover, sectarian

conflicts within one religion prevent

the achievement of a national unity inside one country. All conflicting

parties must know that religion is

for God and the homeland is for all. In addition, mixing politics with religion

causes chaos and confusion.

For example, when the Muslim Brotherhood mingled religion with politics, many political

assassinations took

place: the assassinations of Ahmad Māhir and former Egyptian Prime Minister Mahmūd

Fahmī

al-Nuqrāshī, and the attempted assassination of former President Jamāl

‘Abd

al-Nāsir. Despite all of these crimes, the Muslim Brotherhood is still attempting to make

Egypt a

religious country, as declared by the deputy guide of the Muslim Brotherhood, Muhammad Habīb, last

November.
The author argues that mingling politics with religion causes political destruction and

prevents

democracy, which could establish a strong political country. He adds that any conflict inside one

religion causes

violence between people. For example, the recent events in Iraq between the

Sunnī and the Shī‘ah

destroyed Iraqi unity.
The author wonders how some people can

still fight each other over religion after all

the past years of peace. He adds that people must be more

concerned with the establishment of a better world, full

of peace and cooperation. He asks all Arab

organizations, governmental as well as non-governmental, to cooperate in

order to solve such conflicts.

Thus, the way will be paved to achieve a real national unity between all Arab

countries.

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Article counter: 
44
Text type: 
Quality: 
The article contains no obvious errors...
Classification: 
Opinion
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