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38. A printed picture on an old piece of linen cloth causes fierce controversy over the shroud of Christ

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Article title: 
38. A printed picture on an old piece of linen cloth causes fierce controversy over the shroud of Christ
Publishers: 
Year: 
2007
Week: 
4
Article number: 
38
Article pages: 
p. 12
Date of source: 
24-01-2007
Author: 
George Shakir
Text
Article summary: 

George Shākir writes about the Shroud of Turin, also known as Turin Shroud, which is an ancient piece of linen cloth bearing the image of a man who appears to have been physically traumatized in a manner consistent with crucifixion. As early as October 1978, a group of historians and scientists studied the shroud and concluded that it could be the cloth that covered Jesus of Nazareth when he was placed in his tomb. In 1988, three research centers from Switzerland, England and the United States performed radiocarbon dating on samples taken from a corner of the shroud and announced that it dated back to the 13th or 14th centuries, disproving the myth that the shroud belonged to Christ.

Article full text: 

The story begins in 1357 when a French family [Reviewer: No name mentioned. The family’s name is de Charny] exhibited an old piece of linen cloth in the French town of Lirey, 100 miles from Paris, claiming that it is the shroud of Jesus Christ.

In 1453, the alleged shroud of Jesus Christ moved to Italy when the Savoy family bought it. [Reviewer: The House of Savoy (Italian: Casa Savoia) is a dynasty of nobles who traditionally had their domain in Kingdom of Sardinia, a state which, in 1860, became the Kingdom of Italy. For more information on the Savoy Family, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Savoy]. In 1694, the Catholic Church got hold of the shroud and shrouded the whole matter in secrecy.

In October 1978, a group of experts including historians and scientists, studied the shroud and announced that it could be the cloth that covered Jesus of Nazareth when he was placed in his tomb and that his image was somehow recorded on its fibers at or near the time of his proclaimed resurrection.
Researchers claimed that the image on the shroud was of a real human being and not one created by the use of some early photographic techniques. [Editor: there are scholars who believe that the shroud of Turin was one of Leonardo Da Vinci’s earliest experiments with photography. For more information on the matter see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shroud_of_Turin]

Many Christian believers worldwide found these findings compatible with their beliefs about the crucifixion.
In 1988, three research centers from Switzerland, England and the United States [Reviewer: Oxford University, the University of Arizona, and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology] performed radiocarbon dating on samples taken from a corner of the shroud. All three agreed with a dating in the 13th to 14th centuries (1260-1390). After extensive research, scientists completely ruled out the possibility that the shroud once belonged to Jesus Christ.

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