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18. ‘The sectarian congestion flu’ within the battle of the pigs

Citation
Article title: 
18. ‘The sectarian congestion flu’ within the battle of the pigs
Publishers: 
Year: 
2009
Week: 
21
Article number: 
18
Article pages: 
p. 4
Date of source: 
24-05-2009
Author: 
Ahmad Abu Dayf
Reviewer: 
Basmah Ahmad al-Khashab
Text
Article summary: 

Due to the government’s decision to get rid of all the pigs in Egypt as a result of the recent spread of swine

flu, expatriate Coptic activists launched a severe attack against the government and against Muslims. Moreover, they

interpreted the decision as an example of the oppression of poor Christians and a reflection of a sectarian rift.

Article full text: 

The

recent issue of swine flu in Egypt reflected a state of sectarian ’congestion’ between the Muslims and the Copts. After the

governmental decisions regarding the slaughter of pigs, expatriate Coptic activists launched a campaign on the internet

asking the church to exert pressure on the government to pay compensation of up to two billion Egyptian pounds to those

negatively affected. Moreover, the activists launched a severe attack against the government, Muslims and the Muslim

Brotherhood considering such procedures to be mainly targeting oppressed poor Christians.
Consequently, Prof. Dr.

‘Ammār ‘Alī Hasan emphasized that the issue of swine flu is a universal issue rather than an

Egyptian one; it is a universal epidemic spreading all over the world and killing humans. As a result, it can not be

interpreted in any way as a case of sectarian or religious rift as claimed by some people, this for several reasons. Firstly,

it is not only Christians who keep pigs but Muslims as well, who sell them to make money. Secondly, the situation of these

pig keepers is neither healthy nor legal because the pig farms exist among houses. Thirdly, a large number of Christians do

not eat pork and, hence, large quantities of this meat are being exported or directed to hotels.
Similarly, Dr.

Diyā’ Rashwān stresses that it is purely a case of a spreading epidemic in the first place and, as a result, should

not be ascribed to religious reasons by either Muslims or Christians. Jamāl As‘ad elaborates that some groups

of people usually exaggerate when portraying or displaying problems and tend to explain them in a sectarian way.

Information
Article counter: 
80
Text type: 
Quality: 
The article contains no obvious errors...
Classification: 
News reporting
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