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37. Christians and the Palestinian Issue

Citation
Article title: 
37. Christians and the Palestinian Issue
Publishers: 
Year: 
2009
Week: 
4
Article number: 
37
Article pages: 
p. 9
Date of source: 
28-01-2009
Author: 
Jamal As‘ad
Reviewer: 
Matthew Beeston
Text
Article summary: 

The author questions whether the negative attitude of Christians toward the Palestinian cause is a result of the Islamic aspect of the issue or if there are other reasons for the Christians’ sympathy toward the Israelis.

Article full text: 

The author states that his previous article explains how America has taken advantage of political developments in the Middle East to impose a philosophy of a clash of religions. He says that, as a result, contentious political issues throughout the world are seen in this light, giving the example of Hamās’s transformation of the Palestinian cause into an Islamic, rather than nationalist issue. The author considers that protests against the recent war in Gaza were transformed into an Islamic cry in the face of the Jews and the Crusaders.
Here the author states that the word ’Crusader’ now unfortunately refers to all Christians, whether they are Arab or non-Arab. He thinks it natural that, in the current climate, non-Muslims consider the Palestinian cause primarily as an Islamic issue, and not of concern to themselves, or even, according to the author, support the other side in the struggle, thereby adding to the religious sectarianism which has taken hold.
The author asks if the negative attitude of Christians toward the Palestinian cause is a result of the Islamic aspect of the issue which excludes non-Muslims, or if there are other reasons for the Christians’ sympathy for the Israelis. He refers to this as Zionism’s penetration of Christianity.
In order to explain this penetration, the author states that Christians believe in both Judaism and Christianity, as Judaism is a predecessor of Christianity, whereas they do not believe in Islam because it came after Christianity. Muslims, however, also believe in Judaism and Christianity as the three religions are joined by their faith in the one God. The author quotes a verse from the Bible in which Jesus says, "Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them". Matthew 5: 17, www.biblegateway.com/passage/?book_id=47&chapter=5&version=31http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?book_id=47&chapter=5&version=31] which he says Christians interpret as meaning that Christ’s message added to, and completed the Jewish religion. He sees this idea as the origin of Zionism’s penetration of Christianity.
The author states that his next article will examine whether this verse means that there is no opposition between the Torah and the Bible.

Information
Article counter: 
138
Text type: 
Quality: 
The article contains no obvious errors...
Classification: 
Opinion
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