You are here

6. AWR Daily Overview, May 27, 2012: Al-Qā’idah warns Muslim Brotherhood, April 6 Movement

Citation
Article title: 
6. AWR Daily Overview, May 27, 2012: Al-Qā’idah warns Muslim Brotherhood, April 6 Movement
Publishers: 
Year: 
2012
Week: 
22
Article number: 
6
Date of source: 
May 27, 2012
Author: 
'Amr al-Misrī
Text
Article summary: 

Al-Qā’idah Organization threatened the Muslim Brotherhood group and the April 6 Movement that it will move its activities to Egypt if they continued to “act foolishly as if they were guardians over the Egyptian people’s will,” said a media spokesman of the armed network. [Muhammad Fū’ād, Rose al-Yūsuf newspaper, May 27, p. 1] Read original text in Arabic

Article full text: 

“The Muslim Brotherhood has always been against the revolution while the Salafists have always been rejecting revolts against rulers…black flags were raised in the sit-in of al-‘Abbāssīyah a couple of weeks ago to indicate that al-Qā’idah entered Egypt, which has not taken place so far. However, al-Qā’idah might move its activities in Egypt if the Muslim Brotherhood and April 6 Movement did not stop their follies against the Egyptian people,” said Dr. Ayman al-Fāyīd, a former media advisor for al-Qā’idah (The Base) in a statement.

“Each one who carried a black flag in al-‘Abbāssīyah has been spotted by the Egyptian intelligence service, which is a strong proof belying attempts by the Muslim Brotherhood to frame al-Qā’idah of acts of violence in Egypt and mislead the Egyptian security apparatus to fend suspicions off themselves,” said Fāyīd.

He expected “disasters in Egypt by the Brotherhood” if their candidate Muhammad Mursī did not win the elections now that the Egyptian people will not vote for them again. [Muhammad Fū’ād, Rose al-Yūsuf newspaper, May 27, p. 1] Read original text in Arabic

Meanwhile, Dr. Kamīl Siddīq, the secretary of the Coptic Orthodox Church’s Millī Council in Alexandria, denied that all Coptic votes went to candidate Ahmad Shafīq, adding the majority of their votes went to Hamdīn Sabbāhī.

He also denied that the church has directed its congregation to elect a certain candidate, noting Copts who voted for Shafīq believed he would restore security to the Egyptian street after a state of lawlessness that prevailed in the country.

“The relentless attack on Shafīq has added to his asset,” said Siddīq, adding the runoff round between Shafīq and Mursī brought the Copts to be trapped between two choices: a civil state expressive of Egypt’s moderation or a religious state. [Muhammad Fū’ād, al-Shurūq al-Jadīd, May 27, p. 3] Read text in Arabic

Bishop Bisāntī of Helwan and al-Ma’sarah, commenting on the initial results of the first round of Egypt’s post-revolution presidential elections in which Mursī and Shafīq made it to the runoff round, said Christians will accept what God Has chosen and the president approved by the Egyptian people.

He said that Copts did not vote for a certain candidate, adding there are Copts who voted for Hamdīn Sabbāhī while others voted for ‘Amr Mūsá. [Marco ‘Ādil, al-Akhbār, May 27, p. 3] Read text in Arabic

The deadline to receive papers of candidates for the papal chair of Saint Mark in succession of Coptic Orthodox Pope Shenouda III, who died in March, expired on Saturday (May 26).

The final list of candidates included 18 names – eight bishops and 10 monks – while Bishop Mūsá of Youth stepped down for health and aging reasons. [Ashraf Sādiq, al-Ahrām, May 27, p. 22] Read original text in Arabic

In another development, several Coptic movements protested outside the Supreme Court headquarters on Saturday (May 26) to demand the re-trial of 12 Copts sentenced to life terms for involvement in the sectarian incidents of Abū Qurqās in the Upper Egyptian governorate of al-Minya. [Author Not Mentioned, al-Ahrām, May 27, p. 22] Read original text in Arabic

Egypt is holding its breath watching the results of the presidential elections so anxiously for the next president and to see who wins: the civil camp or the religious camp.

Islamist candidates are parroting slogans advocating freedoms and rights and respect for plurality. Election statements may be mellow in taste and ticklish to feelings but this does not mean ideologies would change.

Ideologies will lie in wait for the right moment to pounce on power, revealing true intentions of racism and division among Egyptians. [Yūsuf Sidhum, Watanī, May 27, p. 1] Read original text in Arabic

Information
Text type: 
Quality: 
The article contains no obvious errors...
Classification: 
News reporting
Classifications
Share this