Displaying 1 - 20 of 31.
Lotus Kīwān managed to conduct an interview with the only Egyptian family that still uses the Coptic language in their everyday conversations.
Coptic, as written in the Coptic script from about the third century AD onwards, is the language of ancient Egypt in its last form. It was so called because it was spoken by the Copts, the Christian descendants of the ancient Egyptians, in whose churches it is read, although not widely understood,...
Pope Shenouda III rebuffs a proposition that mass should be recited in Arabic instead of the poorly understood Coptic language.
A description of a visit to the Convent of St. Dimyānah on the Occasion of the festival of Saint Dimyānah whereby Metropolitan Bīshūy provided the delegation with a detailed explanation of Coptic traditions related to the convent. Dr. Picard noted differences between the way Metropolitan Bīshūy and...
AWR’s last interview with the late Dr. Isaac Fānūs. Comments on self-censorship, such as that of Dr. Otto Meinardus’ differences in writing and saying, which makes it hard for students of the church in Egypt to get a good understanding of the church’s position. Father Basilius of the Monastery of...
This article describes the eighth conference of the St Shenouda the Archimandrite Coptic Society, held at the University of California Los Angeles (U.C.L.A.). The author says that this year’s conference was particularly successful, particularly because of the participation of Coptic youth this year...
The author talks about the Coptic Orthodox Church and the significance of its past role in Egyptian society.
After a visit to the Coptic Museum in 2001, students called for an opportunity to study Coptic history and language. The University of Toronto now offers Coptic Studies in the Department of Near and Middle East Civilizations. Students say that it has been a great experience being introduced to the...
The University of Toronto is now offering Coptic language instruction through the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations,
Egyptian Christians call for changing the language of the Mass from Coptic into Arabic.
A seminar was held at the church of St. Mena in the district of Foum Al-Khaleg, Cairo under the title “The Coptic language and culture…How did they die out and how to revive them?” A debate developed between those who stress that the Coptic language disappeared as a result of the Islamic conquest...
The writer reports about a seminar titled: “The Arabic Coptic” organized by the Center of the Arabic Civilization. The seminar witnessed a great controversy on some of the definitions between what is historical and what is political.
In a lecture he gave in the Library of Alexandria, Pope Shenouda III commented on many issues: The fact that the US and Israel are thought of as representatives of Christianity and Judaism, the Palestinian and Iraqi issues, Zionist Christianity and Coptic history.
The author comments on two recent seminars held by the Cultural Committee in the Journalists’ Syndicate and in the Mar Mina Church in Fom Al-Khalig. The two seminars discussed the possibility of reviving the Coptic and the Hieroglyphic languages. The author stressed that such an idea does not mean...
The author believes that “Rano Series to Teach the Coptic Language” is an attempt to destroy the national unity between Muslims and Christians. He wonders why they call for reviving the Coptic language although the Egyptian church speaks Arabic.
The author says that an 80-year-old version of the Bible written in colloquial Egyptian Arabic dialect has been found.
The calls to revive the Coptic language are opposed by those who fear that this may cause the total social isolation of the Copts inside Egyptian society.
Christians have an interest in reviving some old languages, like Latin, old Hebrew, old Greek, Assyrian and Coptic.
The Higher Council for Culture organized its first two-day symposium titled “Coptic Monuments of Egypt,” which was attended by many professors and research specialists. Abu Al-Hamad Farghali, a professor at the Faculty of Antiquities at Cairo University, explained that a large number of Coptic...
The author believes that religious discourse is one of the main things that can provide support for democratic development. He focuses his argument on the Christian religious discourse.

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