Displaying 1 - 20 of 43.
Dr. Alī Jum’ah, the Grand Muftī, stated that Dār al- Iftā corrects 20-30 incorrect fatwás daily and responds to it in 8 different languages.
`Ali Jūm`ah, member of the Senior `Ulema Council and former Mufti of Egypt, launched an attack on the Muslim Brotherhood, describing them as a “terrorist group that persists to Mūshrik (polytheist) attitude.”
Former Grand Muftī Of Egypt, Dr. ʿAlī Jumʿa, said that God has taken an oath from [Islamic] scholars to introduce the Sharīʿa to the people. “The daʿwa (the invite) to Islam must be with good instruction”, Dr. Jumʿa said, adding, that the Prophet Muḥammad ordered all Muslims to deal fairly with...
Dr. Alī Jumʿah, the former Mufti of the republic, said that we must distance ourselves from the polemics of the current times. He added that wearing the veil "hijāb" is an obligation (Farḍ) in Islam for women. He explained the purpose of hijab is to prevent anybody from seeing her hair without...
Former Grand Mufti of Egypt, Dr. ʿAlī Jumʿa, said that Egypt is the pioneer of the law stipulating the right of women to divorce their husbands, known also as khulʿ, in the Arab and Muslim world.
Muslim holidays coincide with Coptic feasts this year. In an interview with al-Ahrām, Dr. ‘Alī Jum‘ah, the Egyptian Muftī, speaks about the miracle of the birth of Jesus Christ from a Muslim perspective. Demonstrating the status of Christ in Islām, the grand Muftī explains that Islām holds...
The author criticizes religious powers that try to practice a kind of religious guardianship over anyone who is of a different opinion. He demands the respect of others’ way of thinking even if it contradicts our own.
A conference held at the Azhar University, attended by Muslim scholars and medical doctors from Africa, Asia and Europe, condemns female circumcision and denies that it is a religious practice.
Hilmī al-Nimnim answers October’s rumor about the Azhar preventing a book from being published.
This interview with the Muftī of Egypt deals with the issue of female circumcision, which the Muslim cleric said is not a religious duty. In certain cases it could be considered to be a punishable crime because of the assault it makes on the human body.
The niqāb is stirring controversy in different parts of the World. An Egyptian university professor is to be sued for criticizing it; the Egyptian muftī advises that women don’t wear it and students wearing it will be barred from accessing a university hostel. In Western countries it is regarded as...
Father Marqus ‘Azīz Khalīl, the pastor of the Hanging Church, replies to an article by Coptic thinker Jamāl As‘ad, in which he accused Father Khalīl of igniting sectarian sedition in Egypt. The pastor reviews As‘ad’s recent book, ‘Annī A‘tarif’ [Reviewer: I confess] in which, according to Father...
More than 100 Muslim scholars and university professors signed a statement, in which they condemned the insults to the prophet’s companions, which were published by al- Ghad newspaper on October 4, 2006. The statement indicated that any attack against the prophet’s companions and wives...
The review takes up the issue of the niqāb as Jack Straw, Leader of the House of Commons, called on Muslim women in Britain to take off their veils in workplaces, while in Egypt, the President of Hilwān University made a decision to prohibit all niqāb-wearing students from entering the...
Views of Muslim scholars differ over whether to accept the so-called "apology" of Pope Benedict for the remarks he made about Islam a few weeks ago. Nearly 38 Muslim scholars and leaders sent a letter to the pope to indicate their appreciation of the pope’s expression of regret and his affirmation...
For the third week, Pope Benedict’s controversial remarks on Islam and the Prophet Muhammad have made headlines in Egyptian national and independent newspapers. A number of Muslim intellectuals devoted their columns to refute claims about the spread of Islam by the sword. Some Muslim scholars...
The Muftī of Egypt, ‘Alī Jum‘ah, rejects charges levelled against official religious figures that they only serve the government’s point of view and justifies his fatwá which does not advise wearing the niqāb.
The Muftī speaks in this interview about the death penalty, which, he said, should still be in effect to guarantee that the society will not be overwhelmed with vice. He criticizes countries that have legalized prostitution, narcotics and abortion.
Muhammad Fawzī asks Dr.‘Alī Jum‘ah about the differences between the Sunnī and Shī‘ah.
Sayyid Ghannām writes about the latest controversial fatwá issued by the muftī. The fatwá argues that a woman who delivered a child four years after her husband’s death is not adulterous and that pregnancy can span more than nine months.

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