Displaying 101 - 110 of 166.
The author asks whether the concept of "Religion is for God and the nation is for everyone" is merely a motto. Limiting religion to the relationship between man and God is a condition for the realization of this concept. Every one has the right to choose his/her religion as long as he or she does...
[AWR: This is a full text translation of a Dutch text with permission of the author.] Sociology professor Saad Eddin Ibrahim: “You can beat Saddam Hussein, no doubt. But what you cannot do is prevent a new Saddam Hussein from appearing, a new Bin Laden. As long as there is no democracy, no state...
Muhammad Abdel-Qodos is a member of the Muslim Brotherhood. He had once interviewed Watani´s Editor-in-Chief for the weekly Afaq Arabiya (Arab Horizons) on Watani, its mission, focus, and stance regarding national issues. The aim of the interview is to confirm the unity between all Egyptians.
A symposium on "the secularization of the state," organized under the aegis of the Egyptian Organization for Human Rights, has turned into a Coptic-Muslim Brotherhood debate on canceling the second article of the Egyptian constitution, which makes Islam the state religion, and Islamic sharī‘a the...
The author provides a commentary on the Muslim Brotherhood, criticizing its actions and beliefs, and warning that it is gaining substantial ground toward becoming the political leaders of perhaps multiple Arab nations.
In this interview, renowned intellectual and philosopher Murād Wahbā expresses his belief that Hamās has two alternatives; either to succeed in destroying Israel or to change its policy and accept negotiations with Israel. He says that the existance of a strong secular movement is the solution to...
Labīb suggests that Islamic civilization has remained silent about the institutional structure that should shoulder the responsibility of ensuring that power is not abused. It has also never acknowledged political plurality, and there have been zero efforts to get the people to participate in...
Despite the progressive Islamist movements in Turkey and Morocco, liberals are still haunted by the salafī [traditional] experiment of Afghanistan’s oppressive Taliban. Ibrāhīm Gharāyba discusses the concerns of liberals about the Muslim Brotherhood’s political agenda.
After the time of the four caliphs who succeeded the Prophet Muhammad, the Islamic state became a kingdom, in the sense that power was passed from father to sons. This inherited rule was initiated by Mu‘āwīya Ibn Abī Sufyān, the founder of the Umayyad dynasty.
The author argues that religion can never be completely absent from life for man can never be divided into two material and moral beings or religious and secularist entities.

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