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Reviewing a book by a Lebanese writer on whether or not "Islām is the answer."
The author criticizes calls made by Islamic writer Dr. Muhammad ‘Umāra for the return of an Islamic caliphate under the Muslim Brotherhood. He cites opinions by some scholars who argue that the caliphate belongs only to the history books and can never be applied in contemporary times.
The author criticizes the Muslim Brotherhood’s slogan "Islam is the Solution" and describes it as being deceptive. He believes it does not reflect the ideology of the group and calls for a new form of Islamic discourse.
To revive the Azhar, many professors and scholars advocate choosing the shaykh of the Azhar by election instead of appointment.
In an interview Dr. Mahmoud Ismā‘īl explains the reasons behind his strong convection that calls for establishing Islamic religious state are not part of the genuine Islamic teaching, rather they are politically-motivated.
Throughout their history, Muslims have never encountered what is now called women’s issues regarding work, political participation or any other aspect, neither during the age of Islamic glory, nor during the stages of weakness, said Mufti of the Republic ‘Alī Jumca in an interview
One of the most serious problems facing Arab nations is the imaginary Islamic identity, namely the inclination of some political Islam groups to invent an Islamic identity which they want to see replacing the Arab, or even the moderate Islamic, one.
Majdī Khalīl criticizes Muslim extremists who he believes are leading the Arab and Muslim world to backwardness and preventing them from keeping up with modernization.
Intellectual Fahmī Huwaydī criticizes in an interview ailing political practices and blames political parties that fail to rise up to people’s expectations due to their frail partisan performance and internal disputes and power struggles.
William al-Mirrī presents two different explanations for the growing influence of Islamic movements in the Arab world.
Some of the scholars in the dormant Muslim world are busying themselves with only saying all that is new is Haram [unlawful according to the Islamic shari’a.] In fact, some Muslims still believe that the Internet, satellite channels, women’s perfume are haram, at a time our peers on earth live the...
Representatives of the Presbyterian Church and members of various Jewish groups in the United States met on September 29 in New York to discuss the decision of the church to boycott Israel and any organization whose annual donations to Israel exceed one million U.S. dollars. The decision, reached...
The Islamic Shura concept is similar to Western democracy in that both are based on public opinion, power that is within the hands of the ruler and the monitoring of rulers. Both notions acknowledge the idea of dividing power into three areas; executive authority, legislative authority, and...
With the vastness of the Islamic nation due to the Islamic conquests in the era of Omar Ben Al- Khattab, the first Islamic Shura council comprised 70 members of the wisest and most faithful men of the umma [Muslim nation]. In the practical and verbal Sunna, the prophet applied the Qur’anic concept...
In his program “Al-Deen wa Al-Hayat” [Religion and Life], Al-Qaradawi declared his deep faith in democracy and advocated the right of the Brotherhood to establish a legitimate party to run for elections. “The democracy I call for is the democracy of a Muslim society, which has its own fundamentals...
I would like to express my gratitude for all the positive feedback by intellectuals in universities, scientific research, political studies and human rights centers on my book "al-Islām Wa al-Dawla al-Madanīya" [Islam and the Civil State].
There are four pillars that form the rules for the political system in Islam: freedom, justice, shoura [consultation] and equality. These pillars are necessary for the ruling to be Islamic and without them or at least one of them, that system should not be called Islamic.
In his book Features of Despotism, cAbd al-Rahman al-Kawākibī, who was born in Aleppo, Syria in 1854 and died in Egypt in 1902, defines despotism as an epithet of a government that has absolute limitless powers that stops at no law and respects no voice of its people. Kawākibī views that Islam,...
There is a substantial difference between Shura and Democracy. This difference is summed up in the fact that divine law is the source of power in Shura while in democracy the source of power lies in the hands of people.
Dr. Mohammed Selim Al-Awa is an Islamic thinker and well-known law professor. In this continuation article of an interview of him he expresses his opinions on Shura and democracy, Khilafa (the Caliphate), different schools of Fiqh (Islamic jurisprudence) and the issue of non-Muslim minorities in...
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