Displaying 1 - 20 of 26.
Egyptian poet and journalist, Farūq Juwaydah, writes this week: The Egyptian press is undergoing a hard time. It has a diminishing role and continues to lose its way. The questions that need answers are, therefore: What is the future of the Egyptian press in the years to come? How will the many...
Prior to the inauguration of the first Egyptian parliament on March 15, 1924, a young girl named Mounira Thabet [Munīra Thābit] protested against the deprivation of women from casting their votes in the parliamentary elections, demanding the right of women to participate. The demand of Thābit was...
Islamist are divided on the international campaign that the Ministry of Endowments has launched recently to change the name of ISIS in the media to the “Offshoots of al- Qā’idah”. 
The Faculty of Comparative Religion at the University of Manouba, Tunis, Tunisia, invited Cornelis Hulsman to present his work in Egypt to students on the 9th of February, 2018. Hulsman’s lecture covered the following subjects: - Introduction of Dutch sociologist Cornelis Hulsman, Drs., director of...
The State Information Service has faced harsh criticism recently due to its diminished role, to the extent that some are considering that its role is virtually ending. This comes despite the effort exerted by the President of the State Information Service, Ambassador Ṣalāḥ ʿAbd al-Ṣādiq, to...
Aiming at raising awareness through public information, the fourth conference of church media coordinators convened on Monday at the Logos Center of Anba Bishoy Monastery in Wādī al-Natrūn.
On May 24, 1960, Egypt's President Jamāl `Abd al-Nāsser (1954-1970) nationalized the press in Egypt. All privately owned press organizations had to hand their ownerships to the Egyptian Government, who eventually, appointed the editors-in chief.
Egypt's National Council For Human Rights (NCHR) mourned the death of veteran journalist Muhammad Hassanein Haikal, who passed away on Wednesday at the age of 92.
On the occasion of the diamond jubilee of Egypt's Press Syndicate, the Bibliotheca Alexandria (BA) published an illustrated memorial book commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Syndicate.
The media impresario Hishām Qāsim recently presented a lecture at the Netherlands-Flemish Institute in Cairo. In the lecture Qāsim narrated the recent history of the Egyptian press industry and described the current debates, dilemmas and developments governing the media sector. Article full text:...
‘Abd Allāh Kāmil discusses the importance of developing national press in Egypt.
In a sarcastic tone, the author claims that he reads many articles in the Arabic press that make pretty and heavy reading but are in effect taken from the foreign press. These articles are assembled and their authors give them Islamized introductions and nationalistic conclusions. He calls this “...
The author compares between the Arab and Western media in an extended image in which he likens the media to a three-ring circus. He believes that Arab media perform in the outer rings of the circus, away from the middle ring where the greatest show takes place. However, the middle ring is occupied...
The prominent thinker and writer Kāmil Zuhayrī discusses the dangers of monopolization of the press, and calls for a conference of journalists to discuss the future of the media.
The author comments on Khals Jalabi´s “The need for Gandhi in Palestine” and Ma´amoun Fandy´s “The Arabic media was defeated in Jenin.” Jalabi called Arabs for nonviolence and civil resistance in their conflict with Israel and Fandy criticized the Arabic media. The author said that...
The scenes of the national unity iftār [fast-breaking meal during the holy Muslim month of Ramadān] and the shaykh of the Azhar sitting next to the pope on official occasions no longer reflect the new reality.
In this issue, Rose al-Yousuf celebrates its 80th anniversary. Upon the invitation of the magazine, prominent Coptic thinker Dr. Mīlād Hannā writes how Rose al-Yousuf has led the debate over Coptic issues and problems.
Most media outlets in developing countries are directly affiliated with governments and functions as their mouthpieces. That is why media outlets [in developing countries] express only the attitudes and opinions of government officials. These outlets do not advocate the interests of the public,...
The state might look to media organizations that it owns - newspapers, radio, TV, etc.- as if they were its own propaganda instruments to justifies what it does and defend its actions. It is then that these organizations completely lose their independence and turn into pure ideological...
In December 1976, Mamdouh Salem, then Minister of Interior, issued a decision to cancel censorship on books and newspapers. This was one way President Sadat aimed at presenting himself as democratic. The editors and the managers of the newspapers were appointed by the president himself and thus...

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