Displaying 11 - 20 of 127.
Du‘ā’ talks about why Egyptians never vote. She talks to a number of random Egyptian citizens who make it clear that they do not vote because they know for a fact that the elections are “settled in advance.” They are also afraid of the infamous violence that occurs at polling centers. “The majority...
Dr. ‘Abd Allāh al-Ash‘al is a controversial figure who stepped down from his former position as Assistant Minister of Foreign Affairs in 2003. In an interview with al-Dustūr, al-Ash‘al talks about several issues, such as Israel’s former president’s claims about his country’s plans to infiltrate...
Beni Suef Diocese Vicar, Father Bakhūm, said that he received a letter from the National Democratic Party, signed by Secretary General Dr. ‘Abd al-Rahmān Salīm, requesting a list of names that the church would like to run for parliament. Father Bakhūm says he replied with a list of names of four...
Munīr Fakhrī ‘Abd Al-Nūr examines protest movements again the National Democratic Party, reflecting on their causes, effectiveness, and Al- Barād‘ī'’s role in the future of Egyptian politics.
Representatives of the outlawed Muslim Brotherhood at the People’s Assembly and leadership of the ruling National Democratic Party absented from Easter celebrations in Alexandria. Depute Mahmūd ‘Atīyah of the group justified the absence by the different occupations his comrades had.
The issue of the formation of a legal Muslim Brotherhood political party has re-surfaced after the speaker of the People’s Assembly stated that it is time to establish such a party.
The article describes three examples of people who were excluded from the recent local council elections, the author bemoans the fact that when marginalized groups such as Christians and women seek more active participation in the political sphere they are hindered by the ruling National Democratic...
Magdy Malak reflects on the scope and power of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and bemoans the lack of any real opposition parties that are able to compete with the ruling National Democratic Party.
The author discusses political reform in Egypt, and questions if it is even possible with the monopoly that the current ruling party enjoys in the political realm.
Egyptian Churches have criticized the ruling National Democratic Party (NDP) for not inviting them to attend the party’s annual conference. They re-affirmed the necessity of speeding up the activation of the enforcement of the concepts of citizenship and religious freedom.

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