Displaying 1 - 10 of 21.
 The Bahā’ī faith entered Egypt in 1864. A governmental decree was issued in 1960 to dissolve all Bahā’ī gatherings in Egypt. There is no precise enumeration of Baha’is in Egypt.  The city of Acre, Akko, or ʿAkkā in Arabic, is the holiest city for the Bahā’ī faith, and is occupied by Israel.
Zakariyyā 'Abd al-'Azīz, first general attorney at the Cairo appellate instance, decided to postpone the trial of dancer Samā al-Masrī until she had sent her lawyer. A lawsuit has  been filed against her accusing her of disrupting public order with video clips during the era of Mursī which was...
Al-Amr bil-Maarouf wal-Nahy an al-Munkar (AMNM), literally Commanding Virtue and Banning Vice, is the vice police Egyptians used to hear of in the more conservative Islamic countries such as Saudi Arabia. Dressed in Islamic garb, its members roam the streets to check passers-by are adhering to the...
Sa‘d al-Dīn Ibrāhīm tells how Western interest in Egypt has shifted to social and religious issues.
The author reviews the opinions of Muslim scholars about the issue of recognizing Egyptians of Bahā’ī faith in official documents like identity cards as well as questions about marriage with Bahā’īs.
Two weeks ago, al-Fajr published a letter sent in by a Bahā’ī reader, who discussed in detail the principles of the Bahā’ī faith. In its issue of June 19, 2006, al-Fajr publishes two more letters sent in by Muslim readers responding to what they described as falsehoods contained in the...
The review deals with the issue of the Bahā’ī faith in Egypt amidst a tug-of -war between supporters of the Egyptian Bahā’īs’ right to have their faith openly registered in their identity cards and those denying them any rights and terming them as infidels or apostates.
A recent Administrative Judicial Court ruling allowing Egyptian Bahā’īs to have their religion recognized on official documents and the issue of Bahā’ī marriage have been a subject of heated debate in the Egyptian press.
The article focuses on the most famous cases in the courts of law regarding the Bahā’ī faith in Iran, Morocco and Egypt.
The article praises a court ruling repealing a previous ruling that gave Egypt’s nearly 1000 Bahā’īs the right to have their faith registered in official documents, with opinions by intellectuals that Bahā’ism is not a religion and that the only religions recognized in Egypt are the divine...

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