Displaying 41 - 50 of 165.
In support of the national unity, both the Endowments Ministry and the church launch the “Female Preacher and Nun” Initiative under the slogan “Together in the service of the homeland”. The initiative is aimed at speaking and dialoguing with women through Muslim Female Preachers and Christian Nuns...
On September 18th, we met in the Christian Reformed Church of Den Haag in the Netherlands Mrs. Rekaya al-Hafi [Rūqaīya al-Ḥāfī] from Tunisia. She is preparing for participation in the Tunisian presidential elections of 2019. She is going into the elections as a humanitarian activist, and works on...
Also, several feminist leaders slammed failure to have good representation of women in the Qandīl government although Qandīl and before him Mursī had pledged that women will be represented in a way satisfactory to all segments of the society. “Is it acceptable that a post-revolution government...
The National Council for Women (NCW), headed by Dr. Māya Mursī, congratulated Ḥasnāʾ Shaʿbān who became the first female judge in the Economic Court of Tanta, the capital of Gharbiya Governorate, north of Cairo.
Before the outbreak of the 25th of January Revolution, women and Copts have been two politically and socially marginalized groups. However, they managed to make their way to political and social engagement. 
Dr. Shawqī `Allām, Egypt’s Grand Mufti, considered that women holding senior positions is the culmination of their efforts, expertise and efficiency. It conveys many messages and shows that women are capable of performing in all fields. This came during his visit to the Governorate of Bihīra to...
Many women believe that they pay an expensive price for the presence of radicalism and fundamentalism across all three [Abrahamic] religions. In Egypt, the issue of being a Christian woman assuming a senior religious role remains a big problem. Recently, Coptic women started to seek to...
The Egyptian Center for Women’s Rights expressed its deep displeasure from the position of the salafīs’ negative position regarding the appointment of a women as Governor, whereby they used religion to affect the feelings of the simple [poor, undereducated] sectors of the Egyptian population...
There are many arguments regarding why women have stopped reading Qur’an out loud; it has been claimed that it was an attempt to constrain women in their social lives. Historically, women were used to mourn loudly at funerals in an attempt to create an emotional scene. Over time, the cultural base...
In the past, it was common in Egypt to hear women reciting Qur’ān in public ceremonies, religious events, funerals, weddings, big mosques, and even on the radio. Before the Second World War, some senior shaykhs issued a fatwa stating that women's voice is `awrah[an Islamic term that refers to...

Pages

Subscribe to