Displaying 1 - 10 of 40.
Christian officials and religious bodies celebrate these days the Egyptian or Coptic New Year, which begins with the feat of Nayrouz "ʿīd al-Nayrūz" in Arabic. With the rise of the sun of September 11, the year 6253 began according to the Egyptian calendar, which began in 4241 BC, but in terms...
Every year, the city of Tanta, the capital of Gharbiya Governorate, celebrates the holy month of Ramadan in its own special way. Amid wonderful spirits of festivities, lights are focused on Al-Ahmadī Square, where Al-Sayed al-Badawī-'s Mosque, the biggest and most important mosque in Tanta, is also...
The tenth day of Muharram, the first month in the Islamic Hijrī calendar is known as ‘Āshūrā’. This day, is a sacred day celebrated by both Sunnīs and Shī’ah Muslims alike albeit for different reasons. Despite sharing this day in common, it highlights differences and brings memories of unjustified...
It is reiterated in the media, that there is a fear of a civil war in Egypt. Those that echo these statements in the East or the West do not understand the “Egyptian-ness” of Egyptians, the secret of their civilization and their patience, and do not realize the essence of their revolution over the...
Al-Qaradāwī’s controversial statements about the perils of the Shī‘ah’s promulgation in Sunnī countries took the author back to a dispute that took place between Muslim scholars in the sixth hijrī century.
The author of the article provides a randomized review of Dr. Yūsuf Zaydān’s novel ‘‘Azazīl.’ He does not follow the narrative of the novel as much as illuminate the points he wanted to stress: the unpredictable consequences religious fundamentalism can lead to as one should be reasonable and...
January 7 is the day when Copts, in accordance with the Coptic calendar, celebrate Christmas. The occasion received a significant amount of attention in the Egyptian press that published a considerable number of articles about Coptic issues in general and the Christmas celebrations in particular....
The article discusses the heated issue of Coptic feasts, and if Copts are entitled to paid leave to honor these celebrations.
The author discusses the fake religious values Egyptian give to monuments and antiquities that they believe have important spiritual and religious value.
al-Bannā criticizes Retrospectivism and Salafism as flaws in the Islamic Da‘wá that hinder the progress of Muslims and Islam. He also doubts the reliability of many of the Ḥadīths.

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