Displaying 11 - 20 of 87.
As preparations for Christmas celebrations continued, the Coptic Church submitted a detailed memo to the presidency in Egypt about amendments it would like to see made to the new Constitution. These included deleting Article 219, which states that the "principles of Islamic sharī’ah include...
I would like to begin by explaining some of the reasons I chose the topic of blasphemy in Islam. In some respects, I am talking here about elements of the deep structure of the dissertation. These underlying motivations have shaped and inspired this study, but they are not always explicit. I...
Transcript of Dr. Anas Abū Shādī's address “Counter Insult with Arguments by the Pen and Other Non-Violent Means.” (January 27, 2015)
al-Yawm al-Sābiʿ newspaper publishes weekly an edition of Egyptian writer and historian Saʿīd al-Shaḥāt. In his encyclopedia ‘Dhāt Yawm’ (On that Day in History) on major historical events in Egypt and the Middle East region, the Egyptian writer and historian dedicated his column this week to the...
Professor of Comparative Jurisprudence at al-Azhar University Dr. Saʿad al-Dīn al-Hilālī, has recently stated that the Egyptian pharaoh, who argued with Prophet Moses, was not Egyptian, but he was from Khurasān a region located between Iran and Afghanistan and his name was Walīd ibn Rayyān. 
The Egyptian National Authority for Tunnels (NAT) announced the replacement of the fatwā kiosks, one of which was located at Cairo’s main metro station of al-Shuhadāʾ, with art exhibitions, according to sources quoting Egyptian Minister of Transport.
Ḥāmid starts his article by stating his own opinion on the trending Fatwa kiosk by saying, “ The Fatwa Kiosk is a heresy invented by hastened Shaykhs. 
The Egyptian Center for Women’s Rights expressed its deep displeasure from the position of the salafīs’ negative position regarding the appointment of a women as Governor, whereby they used religion to affect the feelings of the simple [poor, undereducated] sectors of the Egyptian population...
The Egyptian Dār al-Iftā’ confirmed that, according to Islamic jurisprudence, it is permissible for Christians in Egypt to build churches if they need this for their worship practices and rituals. There is nothing in Islamic jurisprudence that prevents this. 
The ideas presented by researcher Islām Biḥayrī aim to renew religious discourse by updating, criticizing, and purifying it from impurities that have been associated with it over time. 

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