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Inclusive Citizenship is a dream of many people in our world today. The definition of inclusive citizenship, as I understand it, is the granting of full rights of citizenship to all people regardless of their religion, ethnicity, gender, color, socio-economic status etc. It signifies not just...
Introduction: Inclusive citizenship seeks to go beyond the intellectual debates of recent years on democratization and participation to explore a related set of issues around changing conceptions of citizenship. Peoples’ understandings of what it means to be a citizen go to the heart of various...
This is the transcript of the presentation H.E. Bishop Dr. Yohanna Qulta (84) gave at the Webinar on Inclusive Citizenship on September 26, 2020. This transcript was made by Shady Saleh elSherif. Before Bishop Qulta became a priest he was teaching philosophy at Cairo University, Egypt. He is a...
About 1,574,000 Muslims (3% of the Italian population) are living in Italy, the majority of which of foreign origin. They constitute 29,2% of the migrant community and only 30% are European Muslims (from Albania, Moldavia, Kosovo), whereas 52,7% are from Africa (37,8% from North Africa).[1] The...
[The text was written as a chapter for Freedom of Belief and Christian Mission, Edited by Hans Aage Gravaas, Christof Sauer, Tormod Engelsviken, Maqsood Kamil and Knud Jørgensen. Regnum Edinburgh Centenary Series, Vol.
The Jesuit Foundation will soon publish a book titled “The Door Closed between Copts and Muslims” [al-Bāb al-Mughlaq bayn al-Aqbāṭ wa al-Muslimīn] written by Dr. Aḥmad al-Khamīsī.   Al-Khamīsī mentioned to al-Dustūr that this third edition of the “The Door Closed” includes documentation and brings...
Social reconciliation in Egypt has a long, entangled history. Social reconciliation takes place when families or communities need to settle their disputes. Mediation and negotiation are the cornerstones and focal points for settling societal disputes. Various methods were applied including security...
Akhbār al-Yawm Portal interviewed three Coptic leaders over their thoughts on whether or not Copts should be allowed to attend al-Azhar University. 
Al-Azhar University includes a number of faculties that specialize in Islam but also other faculties not related to religion like commerce, agriculture, science, engineering, medicine, pharmacology, Arabic, linguistics, and translation.  So, why aren’t Christians accepted into these faculties?
In this op-ed, the author writes of the injustices Copts deal with whether they are from terrorists, which target Copts for sectarian and political purposes, or from the state, which fails to give Copts their full rights and treat them equally under the law.  He ties this to the role Copts played...

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