Displaying 191 - 200 of 294.
This editorial, republished from the Wall Street Journal by Watani International emphasizes the issue of Christian persecution throughout much of the Muslim world. Pointing to the fact that out of the top 10 worst persecutors of Christians, 8 of those listed are Muslim nations.  
Watani Editor-in-Chief Youssef Sidhom write on Naj‘ Hammādī: The crime which took place in Nag Hammadi last Wednesday on the eve of Coptic Christmas, can be seen in no light other than being a gross, criminal terrorist act. The Copts were targeted as they left church following Midnight Mass; five...
Watani International reports on the incidents in Naj‘ Hammādī, listing the names of the dead and giving background about the threats reportedly received by Copts over revenge for the alleged rape of a Muslim girl in Farshūt. The article closes comparing the outrage over the killing of Marwa al-...
Muhammad Sha‘bān reports on Ashraf Ramlah’s promotion of fitnah among Muslims and Christians in Egypt.  
Amin Makram Ebeid writes: Cornelis Hulsman kindly asked me to write a few lines on the tragic events that took place in Naj‘ Hammādī and how this could be best managed, punishing the responsible people and working towards reconciliation between Muslims and Christians in the region.  
Nearly one month after the incidents in Najc Hammādī, and with the trial of the three suspects approaching, CIDT’s Molinengo Vivien delves into the meanings and mechanisms of the process of reconciliation, emphasizing the need of punishment in achieving reconciliation between Christians and Muslims...
Cornelius Hulsman is quoted in this report for Dutch daily Reformatorisch Dagblad, arguing that the Christmas Eve attacks in Naga Hammadi are a sign of governmental weakness, suggesting that the security services could have been more prepared for such an incident.
On Monday 15th February, the AWR team held a meeting in our office with a member of Bishop Marcos’ delegation which had travelled to Nag Hammadi, who wished to remain unidentified. We met this source through an earlier visit with Bishop Marcos, in order to discuss our organization’s proper response...
CIDT’s Jayson Casper discusses the role of the difficulties surrounding church building in perpetuating interreligious conflict in Egypt, referring to the example set by Fr. Yu’annis.              
In the wake of the Najc Hammādī killings prevailing Egyptian sentiment has asserted the essential unity between Muslim and Christian, presenting the Christmas massacre as an aberration of the norm. The dominating idea is that Egypt is a country with two religions, but one culture. Muslims and...

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