Displaying 1 - 20 of 96.
This paper is an attempt to outline and illustrate the many facets of the Arab media's reaction to the 2003 invasion of Iraq and the profound emotions it stirred in so many Arabs and Arab journalists. 
Jayson Casper responds to two articles in this week's issue about reports of expatriate Copts' calls for Christians in Egypt to carry arms to defend themselves.
Gerrit Roos investigates the complex relations between Christians and Muslims in Egypt. He interviewed a number of Christian figures and analyzes the reasons why people emigrate from the country.
Hulsman comments on the recent sectarian tensions in Fayyūm that were mentioned in this issue and highlights an article by Tarek Heggy about the role of the Egyptian state in Muslim-Christian tensions.
The Holy Synod of the Coptic Orthodox Church has excommunicated George Habīb Bibāwī. Bibāwī is launching a lawsuit to contest the decision and states that the Synod is a religious authority not a legal one.
The following lines shed light on the cancellation of a Jewish conference that was supposed to be held in Cairo. It also discusses the recent Jewish attempts to regain property in Egypt and the reactions of Egyptian sources to the claims.
The Supreme Council of Press’ report on the performance of the Egyptian press in August reveals that private newspapers have a lack of respect for public personalities’ and executive authority’s rights and that state owned newspapers tend to mix editorial comment and advertisements.
Pope Shenouda's lawyer has announced that the patriarch has approved the proposed new draft law for Coptic Personal Status issues. Contrary to the 1938 law the new draft law states that there are only three reasons for divorce.
Muhammad ‘Azīzīyah's movie depicting Jesus Christ from a Muslim point of view is the subject of heated discussions in different churches. While the Coptic Orthodox Church threatens to resort to the judiciary, ‘Azīzīyah insists on making his movie even if he is obliged to film it in a secular...
Former AWR intern David Grant reports on the state of Egyptian journalism at the present time; highlighting common themes, problems and dilemnas. He concludes his analysis with a look forward to how the Egyptian print media may develop in the next five years.
The article discusses the need for non-partisan reporting and removing emotions from articles, using Arab-West Report to exemplify the importance of such.
The Egyptian press continues to concentrate on the current controversy surrounding the second marriage of Coptic divorcees and the Supreme Administrative Court’s ruling in this regard that obliges Pope Shenouda III to give Coptic divorcees who have obtained a divorce by a court ruling permission to...
Al-Ahrār publishes the report of the Supreme Council of the Press of February, 2008. The report covered Egyptian newspapers and pointed out the violations and the remarks made to every newspaper in fields related to; the documentation of news, violations of the public decency, the rules of...
The controversial court ruling that was issued recently is still creating heated discussions in Coptic and judicial milieus. While some think it is binding and necessary, religious sources reject it because it is a violation of the Biblical teaching.
Dr. Zaynab Radwān, the deputy speaker of the Egyptian People’s Assembly’s controversial argument about women issues under Sharī‘ah is still creating heated discussions in the lay and religious milieus in Egypt. The following lines shed light on the different arguments.
The Egyptian press continues to devote attention to the different reactions to the Supreme Administrative Court ruling allowing Christian divorcees to remarry. The church rejected the ruling and considered it against the Bible and church codes. Some authors highlighted the tragic influence of the...
The article presents the reactions of Egyptian newspapers to the increasing offensives against the Prophet Muhammad in Western media.
The People’s Assembly approved the draft law banning demonstrations in Egyptian houses of worship. The Muslim Brotherhood boycotted the vote and withdrew from the session, and the Minister of Endowments asserted that houses of worship are inviolable.
The controversial statements of the Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams sparked contradictory reactions. While Western and Christian observers attacked him, Muslim thinkers and intellectuals hailed him as a wise just clergyman. The Egyptian media reacted more to the angry reactions than to the...

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