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AWR obtained a paper that was distributed on Tuesday, March 29, 2011 during protests by salafists in front of the Council of State, the Supreme Administrative court, demanding the release of Kāmīliyā Shihātah, a Christian woman who reportedly converted to Islam and was detained inside a church. [...
The article highlights the controversial judgment of second marriage for Copts. The judgment of second marriage of Copts raised a crisis between the Supreme Administrative Court and the Supreme Institutional Court when the latter repealed the judgment. The Council of State's counselor believes that...
 Ḥizb al-Wasaṭ [Center Party], Muslim Brotherhood, the Jamā‘ah al-Islāmiyyah group, and salafīs announced the establishment of political parties.    
  Council of State’s Supreme administrative court issued it’s historical verdict, under the presidency of Counselor Majdī al-'Ajātī, the state council’s vice president, canceling the Ministry of Interior Affair's decision to refraim from proving the religion of those who converted to christianity...
  Muhammad Badī', the Muslim Brotherhood's general guide, threaten to pursue the parliament in front of the Supreme Administrative Court and the Supreme Constitutional Court to have verdicts issued that would render the parliament null and void.   He adds that the nation's will was rigged for the...
On May 29, 2010, the Supreme Administrative Court obliged Pope Shenouda to allow remarriage of divorced Copts, which triggered clashes between the Coptic Orthodox Church and the judiciary. Counselor Muhammad al-Husīn announced from the judiciary bench, “The sanctity of verdicts prevail over any...
Pope Shenouda III, Patriarch of the Coptic Orthodox Church, appealed the Supreme Administrative Court ruling that fined him 150 thousand Egyptian Pounds as compensation for Majdī William. Pope Shenouda had refused to implement the court ruling to give William permission for a second marriage. Pope...
This article looks at the Egyptian Court ruling allowing re-marriage, and the Christian Church’s refusal to accept it.
This article details the Supreme Administrative Court’s final ruling to strip Egyptian men married to Israeli women, and their children, of Egyptian citizenship.
Intern Damas Addeh looks back on his unexpected experience at a Coptic demonstration in Cairo that dealt with the issue of divorce and remarriage within the church.

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