Displaying 1 - 10 of 18.
Michael Munīr was born in 1968 in Egypt in Abu Qurqas near Minia to a Coptic Catholic family even though he today considers himself Coptic Orthodox. Munīr refers to his life in Egypt as a member of an oppressed Christian minority without religious freedom, citing this as his reason to emigrate to...
The issue of church building in Egypt is among the most misunderstood and misreported subjects affecting Muslim-Christian relations.
Some Egyptian Christian emigrants have always been parroting during the former regime's time that they could not come to Egypt to convene meetings and forums for dialogue over the Christian citizens' cares and problems as well as discrimination and challenges facing equality in Egypt.
  Is Islam responsible for the recent increase in sectarian violence against Coptic Christians? AWR Chief Editor Cornelis Hulsman responds in this week's editorial.      
This article explains Sādiq’s claim that the use of Nile Water in Egypt can be used to the benefit of Coptic activists. He calls on Ethiopia to use Nile water as a bargaining tool for Coptic rights in Egypt. 
Jayson Casper responds to two articles in this week's issue about reports of expatriate Copts' calls for Christians in Egypt to carry arms to defend themselves.
Osama al-Ghazoly is a seasoned journalist who we asked to evaluate the media discourse on Izbet Bushra, paying special attention to coverage given to expatriate Coptic websites. Since some of these websites make reference to human rights reports produced in Egypt, Osama has also involved these...
The article is a response to questions received by AWR in 2003 from different Western churches, Christian organizations, Christian leaders and Human Rights Watch, based on material from Western sources and interviews with a few western missionaries then living in Egypt.
The following presents an investigative report authored by Mads Akselbo Holm, an intern for Arab-West Report, on the issue of Muslims leaving their faith. This study provides an excellent background to the commotion caused by Muḥammad Ḥijāzī announcing his conversion to Christianity.

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