Displaying 11 - 20 of 75.
The article analyses the rocky relations between Egypt and Israel since the 1979 peace treaty. It reflects on the prospects for normalisation between the two states and states that as long as the Egyptian people are strongly sympathetic with the Palestinians then the likelihood of improved...
Based on the lectures given at the Danish-Egyptian Dialogue Institute symposium on de-radicalization and dis-engagement in December 2009 one of the CIDT interns, Vivien Molinengo wrote this paper on societal collapse and radicalization. He argues that the notion of societal collapse was a leitmotif...
A De-radicalization Conference was held on 2-3 December 2009 in the Golden Tulip Flamingo Hotel, Cairo. The conference was hosted by the Danish-Egyptian Dialogue Institute. About 12 papers were presented, mostly by Egyptians, but with contributions from Norway, Denmark and the United Kingdom. In...
The author describes various positions on the demonstrations of Expatriate Copts abroad. Foreign countries, the Egyptian government, and the Coptic organization seem to be little affected by these demonstrations.
Diyā’ Rashwān gives three reasons for the impression of religion over the political platform of the Muslim Brotherhood’s proposed party.
Increasing political participation of religious groups is a subject being raised more frequently. This issue presents a number of articles that address this topic, and comment on the role of these groups play in politics, namely how their religious influences shape and mold their political...
This week’s articles about the reactions to the introspections of the Jihād Group showed an extent of sympathy for the conditions of Islamist detainees and even the ones who have just been released.
A priest and a historian and intellectual are two examples of sowing sedition and hatred between Muslims ands Christians.
The Egyptian press analyzes the various repercussions of the declared introspections of the Jihād Group. Political observers and specialists in political Islam differ in their evaluation of these introspections.
al-Jamā‘ah al-Islāmīyah and al-Jihād have major structural differences; however, they are both engaged in revisions that will stop the groups’ from using violence in their political activity. al-Qā‘idah fears the influence of the introspections on its members.

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