Displaying 1 - 10 of 14.
Dr. Mīnā Badī‘ ‘Abd al-Malik reviews the life and contributions of the late Dominican Father George Qanawātī.
As an intern at the Center for Intercultural Dialogue and Translation, my main aim has been to foster intercultural relations between the West and the Arab world. Integrated in a research team, I had the opportunity to delve into precise topics (such as the issue of mosque building in Egypt), and...
Hānī Labīb reviews the life and contributions of the late Father George Qanawātī on the occasion of the 14th anniversary of his death.
The Dominican order affected Father George Qanawati and his efforts in the field of inter-religious dialogue. He was a prominent philosopher who defended Islam and other religions. He was able to enter history through his belief that dialogue between religions and cultures is necessary.
The monastery of the Dominican fathers in Cairo contains the largest Islamic library in Egypt. It contains 90,000 books on Islam, history, religious sciences and other sciences that can be used for conducting researches.
A brief background about the late Father Geroge Qanawati and some of his writings that contributed to consolidating the culture of inter-religious dialogue. He wrote about the common denominators between Islam and Christianity and the Coptic era in Egypt.
Father George Qanawati, who passed away on January 28, 1994, was one of the most prominent Arab intellectuals who paid great attention to consolidate dialogue between religions and cultures. He was the Vatican’s advisor for the secretariat of dialogue with non-Christian Believers.
In a scenario that has already been repeated several times, 31-year-old Coptic lawyer Athanasius William raised the issue of Copts’ joining the Azhar University. When William applied to join the Azhar’s Sharī‘a and Law College, he was denied access in accordance with the university’s rules that...
The author remembers the accomplishments of late Father George Qanawātī and his valuable contribution to cultural life in Egypt and dialogue between Muslims and Christians.
Qanawātī was born in Alexandria on June 6, 1905 to a Greek Orthodox Christian family. He later converted to Catholicism. He obtained his degree in pharmacology from the Saint Joseph Jesuit College in Beirut in 1926, a diploma in chemical engineering from Lion university in France in 1928. In 1934,...

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